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Orest Maximov
Orest Maximov

LG G Watch Also Available From Mobile Fun UPD



With the G Watch R Smartwatch Charging Cable, plug one end into the connection on the charger when attached to your watch and the other into a standard USB port. The USB can be placed into a computer, laptop, netbook or any other powered USB connection. An AC power adapter can also be used.




LG G Watch also available from Mobile Fun



With the power of Google, you can be alerted of important events and notifications all from your smartwatch. Learn about any change to your flight's schedule or whether your journey has any delays along the way - the LG G Watch powered by Android Wear ensures you are never out of the loop.


Because life waits for no one, at LG USA we create consumer electronics, appliances and mobile devices that are designed to help you connect with those who matter most. Whether that means cooking a nutritious, delicious meal for your family, staying connected on-the-go, sharing your favorite photos, watching a movie with your kids or creating a clean, comfortable place to celebrate the moments that matter, we'll be there for you every step of the way.


To access all its fun and useful features, you'll want to connect your smart watch to your phone using the Galaxy Wearable app. If your phone isn't available, you can also set up your watch without a phone and pair it with the Galaxy Wearable app later. Once everything is set up, your smart watch and phone will make a dynamic duo. You can even automatically sync data between the two of them, such as your workout information from Samsung Health.


The Galaxy Wearable app connects your smart watch to a compatible phone. You should make sure to check if your phone is on the list of compatible phones. Then, you can use the app to manage and monitor your watch's features and apps installed from the Play Store. But first, make sure Bluetooth is activated on your phone.


Note: If needed, you can access accessibility settings from the Welcome screen on your watch or fitness band. Also, if you have accessibility options set up on your connected phone, you can set your watch settings to match the phone.


If you have an iPhone, you can still easily set up and connect your smart watch using the Samsung Galaxy Watch app from the App Store. If you have a fitness band like the Galaxy Fit, use the Samsung Galaxy Fit app to connect.


If you have no phone, it's no problem! With certain watch models, you can still use your watch when it's solo. Before you set up a new mobile plan, you may be asked if you want to restore your watch's settings from a previous backup. Doing so can ensure that you keep all of the current apps, app settings, and data.


A smartwatch is a wearable computer in the form of a watch; modern smartwatches provide a local touchscreen interface for daily use, while an associated smartphone app provides management and telemetry, such as long-term biomonitoring. While early models could perform basic tasks, such as calculations, digital time telling, translations, and game-playing, smartwatches released since 2015 have more general functionality closer to smartphones, including mobile apps, a mobile operating system and WiFi/Bluetooth connectivity. Some smartwatches function as portable media players, with FM radio and playback of digital audio and video files via a Bluetooth headset. Some models, called watch phones (or phone watches), have mobile cellular functionality such as making telephone calls.[1][2][3]


Software may include digital maps, schedulers and personal organizers, calculators, and various kinds of watch faces. The watch may communicate with external devices such as sensors, wireless headsets, or a head-up display. Like other computers, a smartwatch may collect information from internal or external sensors and it may control, or retrieve data from, other instruments or computers. It may support wireless technologies such as Bluetooth, Wi-Fi, and GPS. For many purposes, a "watch computer" serves as a front end for a remote system such as a smartphone, communicating with the smartphone using various wireless technologies. Smartwatches are advancing, especially their design, battery capacity, and health-related applications.[5]Health-related applications include applications measuring heart rate, SpO2, workout, etc.


With the introduction of personal computers in the 1980s, Seiko began to develop computers in the form of watches. The Data 2000 watch (1983) came with an external keyboard for data-entry. Data was synced from the keyboard to the watch via electro-magnetic coupling (wireless docking). The name comes from its ability to store 2000 characters.[7] Its memory was tiny, at only 112 digits.[6] It was released in 1984, in gold, silver and black.[8] These models were followed by many others by Seiko during the 1980s, most notably the "RC Series". The RC-1000 Wrist Terminal was the first Seiko model to interface with a computer, and was released in 1984,[7] subsequently priced at around 100,[9] providing 2 KB of storage and a two-line 12-character display, transferring data from a computer using an RS232C interface.[10] It was developed by Seiko Epson and was powered by a computer on a chip and was compatible with most of the popular PCs of that time, including Apple II, II+ and IIe, BBC Micro,[11] Commodore 64,[12] IBM PC, NEC 8201, Tandy Color Computer, Model 1000, 1200, 2000 and TRS-80 Model I, III, 4 and 4p. The RC-20 Wrist Computer was released in 1985, under the joint brand name "Seiko Epson".[13][14] This was followed by the RC-4000 and RC-4500.


During the 1980s, Casio began to market a successful line of "computer watches", in addition to its calculator watches. Most notable was the Casio data bank series. Novelty "game watches", such as the Nelsonic game watches, were also produced by Casio and other companies.[15]


The Timex Datalink wristwatch, was introduced in 1994. The early Timex Datalink Smartwatches realized a wireless data transfer mode to receive data from a PC. Appointments and contacts created with Microsoft Schedule+, the predecessor of MS Outlook, could be easily transmitted to the watch via a screen blinking light protocol.


In June 2000, IBM displayed a prototype for the WatchPad, a wristwatch that ran Linux. The original version had only 6 hours of battery life, which was later extended to 12.[24] It featured 8 MB of memory and ran Linux 2.2.[25] The device was later upgraded with an accelerometer, vibrating mechanism, and fingerprint sensor. IBM began to collaborate with Citizen Watch Co. to create the "WatchPad". The WatchPad 1.5 features a 320 240 QVGA monochrome touch sensitive display and runs Linux 2.4.[26][27] It also features calendar software, Bluetooth, 8 MB of RAM and 16 MB of flash memory.[28][29] Citizen was hoping to market the watch to students and businessmen, with a retail price of around $399.[29] Epson Seiko introduced their Chrono-bit wristwatch in September 2000. The Chrono-bit watches have a rotating bezel for data input, synchronize PIM data via a serial cable, and can load custom watch faces.[30]


In the same year, Microsoft announced the SPOT smartwatch and it began hitting stores in early 2004.[34] SPOT stands for Smart Personal Objects Technology, an initiative by Microsoft to personalize household electronics and other everyday gadgets. For instance, the company demonstrated coffee makers, weather stations, and alarm clocks featuring built-in SPOT technology.[35] The device was a standalone smartwatch[36] that offered information at a glance where other devices would have required more immersion and interaction. The information included weather, news, stock prices, and sports scores and was transmitted through FM waves.[34] It was accessible through a yearly subscription that cost from $39 to $59.[35]


The Microsoft SPOT Watch had a monochrome 90126 pixel screen.[37] Fossil, Suunto, and Tissot also sold smartwatches running the SPOT technology. For instance, Fossil's Abacus, which was a variant of the Fossil Wrist PDA, retailed from $130 to $150.[38][35]


In 2013, the claim to first ever smartwatch to capture the full capability of a smartphone was laid by startup Omate with the TrueSmart. The TrueSmart originated from a Kickstarter campaign which raised over 1 million dollars, making it the 5th most successful Kickstarter to date. The TrueSmart made its public debut in early 2014.[61] Consumer device analyst Avi Greengart, from research firm Current Analysis, suggested that 2013 may be the "year of the smartwatch", as "the components have gotten small enough and cheap enough" and many consumers own smartphones that are compatible with a wearable device. Wearable technology, such as Google Glass, was speculated to evolve into a business worth US$6 billion annually, and a July 2013 media report revealed that the majority of major consumer electronics manufacturers were undertaking work on a smartwatch device at the time of publication. The retail price of a smartwatch could be over US$300, plus data charges, while the minimum cost of smartphone-linked devices may be US$100.[62][63]


As of July 2013, the list of companies that were engaged in smartwatch development activities consists of Acer, Apple, BlackBerry, Foxconn/Hon Hai, Google, LG, Microsoft, Qualcomm, Samsung, Sony, VESAG and Toshiba. Some notable omissions from this list include HP, HTC, Lenovo, and Nokia.[63] Science and technology journalist Christopher Mims identified the following points in relation to the future of smartwatches:


At the 2014 Consumer Electronics Show, a large number of new smartwatches were released from various companies such as Razer Inc,[74] Archos,[75] and several other companies, as well as a few startups. Some had begun to call the 2014 CES, a "wrist revolution"[76] because of the number of smartwatches released and the huge amount of publicity they began to receive at the start of 2014. At Google I/O on 25 June 2014, the Android Wear platform was introduced and the LG G Watch and Samsung Gear Live were released. The Wear-based Moto 360 was announced by Motorola in 2014.[77] At the end of July, Swatch's CEO Nick Hayek announced that they will launch a Swatch Touch with smartwatch technologies in 2015.[78] In the UK, the Wearable Technology Show made its debut in London and was host to several smartwatch companies exhibiting their newest models. 350c69d7ab


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